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Doha: 2/2/2020 AD Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, met in his office at […]

Doha: 2/2/2020 AD

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, met in his office at the Committee’s headquarters with Mr. Nathapol Khantahiran, Ambassador of Thailand to the State of Qatar. The two sides discussed aspects of cooperation on issues of common concern and ways to exchange experiences and expertise in the legal fields.

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We will soon announce a report on the persistence of Saudi Arabia in violations of the rights of citizens and […]

We will soon announce a report on the persistence of Saudi Arabia in violations of the rights of citizens and residents in Qatar

The report of Saudi violations will be submitted to the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

Increased concern for the rights of victims due to the UAE’s intransigence and persistence in its violations

The UAE has not established a clear mechanism to implement the court’s order to protect the rights of victims

We report cases of violations after the issuance of the ICJ order, including continued arbitrary, unilateral and coercive measures violating civil, economic and social rights

The UAE flouts its obligations and commitments to implement the court’s decision

Imposing sudden restrictions on travel for all, without regard to humanitarian situations, especially children and mothers

Emirati media officials and social media influencers engage in escalation and incitement against the State of Qatar

The UAE remains committed to cutting ports with Qatar confirming its continued violation of the right to movement

Abu Dhabi imposed unilateral sanctions and arbitrary measures on its citizens including imprisonment and a fine on people showing sympathy towards Qatar

The NHRC contacted all victims to ensure that the UAE did not comply with the order of the International Court of Justice

The report includes recommendations to the “International Justice”, UAE and Qatar in order to put an end to the violations

We call on the government of Qatar to submit a detailed report on the UAE’s commitment to the court’s decision to the Secretary General of the United Nations, the President of the International Court of Justice, the Security Council, the Human Rights Council, and the United Nations Committee against Racial Discrimination

Addressing 600 international organizations to pressure the UAE to comply with the order of the International Court of Justice

The report are submitted to all diplomatic missions accredited to the United Nations and specialized international agencies

Geneva, January 24, 2020

Dr. Ali bin Samikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, strongly criticized the UAE for its continued violations of the rights of citizens and residents in the State of Qatar, with 2105 violations by UAE since the start of the blockade imposed on Qatar, including 1212 violations of the order of the International Court of Justice a year and a half after its issuance, announcing at the same time that a report will be issued soon regarding the persistence of the authorities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in violating the rights of citizens and residents in the State of Qatar, where the report will be submitted to the Committee against All Forms of Racial Discrimination and all international mechanisms.

Dr. Ali bin Samikh Al-Marri stressed in press statements from Geneva that the Abu Dhabi authorities did not establish a clear mechanism to implement the court’s decision to protect the interests of the victims and ensure the elimination of violations; which reaffirms their continued obstructions and punitive and discriminatory measures against the citizens and residents of the State of Qatar, which flouts all obligations and commitment to implement the order of the International Court of Justice.

Al Marri noted the increasing concern about the rights of victims due to the UAE’s continuing violations, calling on both the International Court of Justice, the United Arab Emirates and the State of Qatar to expedite the response to the recommendations contained in the report by the National Human Rights Committee to put an end to the violations resulting from the continued blockade Two and a half years ago.

Al-Marri submits the report to the High Commissioner for Human Rights and Special Procedures

During his visit to Geneva, the Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee met with a number of officials of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the United Nations Special Procedures Division, where he presented a copy of the second report on Emirati violations of the order of the International Court of Justice. He also delivered a copy of the report to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and the President of the Human Rights Council.

Al Marri noted that the National Human Rights Committee will address the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the President of the International Court of Justice, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the President of the United Nations Committee against Racial Discrimination, special rapporteurs of the United Nations, and the President of the European Parliament, along with 600 international organizations, to put pressure on UAE to comply with the decisions of the International Court of Justice and stop its violations. The report will also be sent to all diplomatic missions accredited to the United Nations and specialized international agencies.

The second report monitors UAE violations of ICJ’s order

Dr. Ali bin Samikh Al-Marri launched the second report by the National Human Rights Committee, regarding the continued Emirati violations of International Court of Justice order issued, based on lawsuit filed by the State of Qatar against the UAE before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the background of its violation of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. Qatar joined the ICERD on July 22, 1974, while the UAE joined the ICERD on June 20, 1974, where neither party made any reservation to Article (22) or any other articles related to the case before the ICJ.

The report contains updated data and information, based on the complaints received by the NHRC during the period from the beginning of the blockade to date, knowing that the number of affected individuals who have not submitted complaints is much bigger than what the complaints submitted to the NHRC. The NHRC had previously issued a report entitled “Six months after the issuance of the ICJ order, UAE’s fails to comply”, 15 January 2019, which monitor the compliance of the UAE’s commitment with the ICJ order.

The report also includes an analysis of updated statistics on human rights violations, and testimonies of victims of violations of their fundamental rights by UAE authorities. It also deals with violations against these victims. The NHRC shall continue to update the present report as long as the blockade continues, the damage sustains, and complaints continue to be submitted by victims, knowing that the Government of Qatar does not take any action against citizens of the UAE or other countries that sever diplomatic ties with the State of Qatar.

The present report monitors the continuation of the UAE’s violations of human rights and explains the impact of arbitrary unilateral measures taken by it against the State of Qatar. It also monitors the extent of the UAE’s implementation of the ICJ order issued a year and a half ago (July 23, 2018 to December 31, 2019). The present report is based on monitoring process and other information collection undertaken by the NHRC.

The report provides a comprehensive review of all human rights violations, particularly the rights included in the ICJ order, which should be read in conjunction with the report issued by the NHRC entitled (after “six” months … the UAE’s non-compliance with the ICJ orders, 15 January 2019). The report addresses data and information related to these violations, especially examples of some cases that confirm the UAE’s non-compliance with the court’s order and not establishing a clear mechanism that works to overcome hardships facing victims and retrieval of damage caused to them. The report highlights in its first part human rights violations included in the ICJ order which come in two parts, including the right to family reunification, the right to education, and the right to have access to courts and other judicial bodies (1212 violations). The second part refers to measure to prevent the escalation of the Gulf crisis by spreading hate speech, incitement to violence and dissemination of racial discrimination against the State of Qatar and its residents. The report also includes other violations committed by the UAE not covered by the ICJ order. These are violations that are closely related to the rights contained in the court’s order, as monitored by the NHRC as follows: Violations of the right to private property, the right to movement and residence, the right to work, the right to health, and freedom of opinion and expression. The total violations committed by the UAE has reached (2105).

In its final part, the Report includes All legal aspects related to the rights pertaining to the ICJ order in accordance with provisions of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination as well as legal aspects of other violations mentioned in the present report, Conclusions of the present report and previous reports including the continued failure of the UAE to comply with the ICJ order and continued violation of human rights due to the unilateral actions and arbitrary measures taken by it during the past year and a half following the issuance of the decision and Recommendations to all parties concerned with the ICJ order which compels and obligates the UAE to rescind the arbitrary decisions it has taken, lift injustice and redress and compensate victims.
Human rights violations contained in the ICJ order

A. Violation of the Right to Family Reunification

A year and a half after the issuance of the ICJ order, the UAE continues to take unilateral arbitrary actions and measures against the State of Qatar including violation of the right to family reunification and rupture of the Social Fabric. Sudden restrictions on travelling have been enforced for all without regard to humanitarian situations, in clear violation of human rights, especially those of the most vulnerable groups such as children and mothers.

The UAE authorities claim that since June 5, 2017, no administrative or legal measures have been taken to expel Qatari citizens. The NHRC, however, confirms that this allegation is misleading containing many evident fallacies to escape legal and rights-related responsibilities resulting from violations that have been and continues to be carried out by the UAE authorities since the beginning of the blockade, even after the ICJ order. This is confirmed by reports issued by international organizations and some parliamentary delegations as well as reports of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the special rapporteurs who have visited the State of Qatar after the blockade. The NHRC in the State of Qatar has documented in its successive reports hundreds of cases that have been expelled by the UAE authorities, without taking into consideration the situation of mixed families, Qatari students, owners of property, persons with disabilities or patients and people receiving medical treatment.

The implementation of the ICJ order obliges the UAE to establish a clear mechanism to ensure the reunification of Qatari families who have been affected by arbitrary unilateral and continuous measures. The NHRC monitored and documented the UAE’s non-compliance with the ICJ order regarding family reunification, through contacts it made with a large number of victims after the issuance of the court’s order. There were even new cases of violations of this right that were also monitored and documented.
The cases of violations related to this right, which amounted to (90) cases, have not been addressed. Instead, some of these families faced great difficulties while attempting to reunite. The previous report, issued by the NHRC issued on January 15, 2019, dealt with a number of cases and the difficulties and obstacles they faced caused by the UAE.

B. Violation of the Right to Education

The right to education is a fundamental inalienable right, and the NHRC has observed a flagrant violation of this right over a year and a half of arbitrary, unilateral and coercive measures taken by the UAE against the State of Qatar even after the issuance of the ICJ order which affirms providing an opportunity for Qatari students to complete their education in UAE, or obtain their educational records if they wish to continue their studies elsewhere.

It should be noted that since the beginning of the blockade, the State of Qatar has resolved a number of cases of students expelled from the UAE. This, however, does not negate the damage that have occurred due to the coercive measures, as the students faced many difficulties.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Education made two visits to Qatar in January and December 2019 and met with a number of victims of violations of the right to education as a result of the blockade. The Special Rapporteur has addressed the UAE twice with regard to the protection of the rights of Qatari students, but the UAE has not responded to his calls and requests. The Committee notes the meeting of the United Nations Technical Mission with affected Qatari students. A number of international human rights organizations have also filed complaints with the UNESCO about the cases of Qatari students whose Right to Education was violated as a result of arbitrary unilateral measures taken by the UAE, which are still under way.

An example of the violation of this right is that two Qatari students were suspended and removed from the records of the University of Sharjah on June 5, 2017. The UAE also violated the data privacy of these two students who were expelled from the university, by publicizing their reports during the session of the Committee on Conventions and Recommendations (CR) at the UNESCO, which were held on October 9, 2019 at the 207th session of the UNESCO Executive board in Paris. These documents were not sealed or notarized by the universities or printed on official papers of the university but were rather distributed in the form of (photocopies).

There is a wide range of cases related to the violation of this right documented by the NHRC since the beginning of the blockade and following the ICJ order. The Total of violations of the Right to Education reached (155) cases. The NHRC also monitored few cases which were solved with difficulty following the ICJ order.

C. Violation of the Right to have Access to Courts and other Judicial Bodies

Violations of the UAE due to the arbitrary unilateral actions and measures taken against the State of Qatar two and a half years ago extended to violating the right of Qatari citizens to have access to courts and other judicial bodies (the right to litigate), and to defend themselves before the UAE courts (the right to a fair trial). This is despite the fact that the UAE is obligated under the treaties or conventions that confer jurisdiction on the Court to implement the rulings issued for the benefit of any member. Failure from the UAE side to implement the ICJ’s rulings is a violation of international legitimacy and law, charters and treaties. Moreover, the implementation of court orders, whether national or international, must be carried out immediately and the UAE should separate out implementation of the provisions of the law, court orders and political whims.

Violation of the Right to have Access to Courts and other Judicial Bodies

Many citizens had court rulings issued in their favour, whether in relation to recovering their money, property, or legal rights. However, they were shocked that UAE courts cancelled these rulings, neglected their implementation, or did not apply them, or with complacency in restoring the rights of Qataris living in UAE. Furthermore, Some Qataris were subjected to legal violations in financial and business dealings with individuals from the UAE, and those dealings resulted in the loss of their money and property due to bouncing checks or the loss of their financial rights.

In its previous reports, the NHRC has mentioned cases related to the Right to have Access to courts and other Judicial Bodies, particularly in its report on the ICJ order, which obliges it to take the necessary steps to allow Qataris affected by the measures it adopted on June 5, 2017 to have access to UAE courts and other judicial bodies. The NHRC noted that after the issuance pf the ICJ order and until the date of this report, the UAE has not established a clear mechanism to implement the Court’s order to protect the interests of the victims.

2. Other human rights violations:

The report reviews a number of other violations that were not stipulated in the ICJ order. these violations resulted from the blockade and unilateral coercive measures on the State of Qatar. This part clarifies through the NHRC’s monitoring and documenting the UAE’s continuing violations of these rights from the start of the blockade on June 5, 2017, to the date of publishing this report.

A. Violation of the Right to Property

The number of cases submitted to the NHRC regarding the violation of the Right to Property is amounted to (514) during the two and a half years of the blockade imposed by the UAE on the State of Qatar. It should be noted that there are hundreds of complaints lodged with the compensation claim committee as well. The NHRC affirms, through the cases it has received, that the UAE continues to ignore the ICJ order, which obliges it to address the conditions of Qatari investors and properties owners, as the UAE, who violated their Right to Property has not allowed them access to UAE courts judicial bodies.

B. Violation of the Right to movement and Residence

The Right to Freedom of Movement and Residence is one of the rights shall not be subject to any restrictions except those which are provided by law, are necessary to protect national security, public order, public health or morals or the rights and freedoms of others as stipulated in Article (12/3) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

During the two and a half years of the UAE’s blockade of the State of Qatar, this right continued to be violated even following the ICJ order. The UAE continues to impose restrictions on freedom of movement and residence and to prevent and hinder the freedom of both Qataris and residents of the State of Qatar, in violation of international Human Rights law and all relevant international conventions and agreements.

C. Violations of the Right to Work:

The right to work is one of the fundamental rights every human being should be entitled to. During the two years and a half of the blockade, UAE has committed numerous violations of economic and social rights, including the right to work. Among the prominent forms of violations is the loss of jobs by hundreds of individuals as a result of the arbitrary decisions by the UAE forcing these individuals to leave the UAE and preventing their return back to their jobs.

D. Violations of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression:

Violations to the right to freedom of opinion and expression continued despite appeals by human rights activists to put these practices to a halt, since the exercise of that right – without fear or any illegal intervention – is key to living in an open-minded and equitable society, where people enjoy access to justice and the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

Furthermore, the NHRC has monitored the unprecedented levels of the UAE’s deliberate persistence to violate this right, throughout the two-and-a-half-year period of the blockade on the state of Qatar. The UAE has imposed penalties and undertook unilateral arbitrary actions on UAE nationals and other persons present on the UAE territories, simply for showing sympathy for Qatar.

The report with regard to this decision had indicated that violations of the right to freedom of opinion and expression prevail in the society in a way contrary to ethics, values and human rights, reflecting the nature of the UAE state regime.

E. Violations of the Right to Health:

The right to health is one of the fundamental and indispensable human right. Therefore, violating this right by UAE through the ongoing adoption of unilateral arbitrary decisions for the period of two years and a half had a number of repercussions, according to the report of the OHCHR Technical Mission to the State of Qatar. Cutting trade relations had affected Qatar’s access to medicines and medical supplies, including life-saving drugs. Qatar used to procure 50 to 60% of the medicine stocks of supplying companies domiciled in the territories of the GCC states, mostly from the companies located in UAE. Although the shortage of medicine in Qatari markets had lasted for only one day; the period which the Government of Qatar needed for the identification and selection of the new suppliers, the Ministry reported to the Technical Mission team that a search was still underway for alternatives for 276 items, including medications for the treatment of snake bite poisoning cases, as these medications can only be produced from the snakes inhabiting the region; which is no longer available.

Mass violations of international conventions and laws

The report confirms that the actions undertaken by the UAE through the non-compliance with the order of the ICJ for a year and a half, constitute a flagrant breach of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and all the regional and international regulations, laws, treaties and conventions as the UAE had failed to overcome the difficulties faced by the victims of the blockade against the state of Qatar and continued to undertake unilateral arbitrary forcible measures.

The UAE had blatantly violated the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, together with a number of regional and international treaties and conventions, including, inter alia, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the Arab Charter on Human Rights, the GCC Human Rights Declaration and the Unified Economic Agreement between the Countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (aimed towards a gulf citizenship; including equal treatment with regard to movement, residence, work, investment, education, health, and social services). The above treaties and instruments hold states responsible for the protection and preservation of the rights and interests of the individuals residing on their territories.

Moreover, the UAE had grossly violated the Chicago Convention (the Convention on International Civil Aviation) and had blocked Qatar airplanes from flying on the UAE lands, territorial seas and airspace, with no military necessity or reasons of public security.
Conclusions:

The NHRC emphasizes the below conclusions regarding the repercussions of the Blockade on Qatar:

• Unilateral arbitrary and forcible procedures and measures taken by The UAE has caused a range of violations of civil, economic and social human rights.
• Human rights violations continue because of the unilateral arbitrary and forcible procedures and measures that have been taken by the UAE since 5 June 2017 to date, whereas it has not taken any provisional measures to solve victims’ cases or remedy the damage that had been inflicted upon them after a year and a half of the International Court of Justice’s decision.
• Measures taken by the UAE to punish citizens and residents of the State of Qatar and citizens of the GCC states have been used as a tool for political pressure and a means for managing political disagreements, in a manner that amounts to collective penalties affecting individuals and property.
• The UAE has not established a clear mechanism to implement the International Court of Justice’s decision, whether by identifying or publicizing any mechanism taken that that would be resorted to by the victims in order to regularize their situations. Additionally, it has not dedicated any hotlines for this purpose.
• Discriminatory measures taken by the UAE, hate speech which always tends towards contempt and abuse of Qatari people, as well as defaming prominent figures of the State are all actions amounting to racial discrimination.
• Victims failing continuously to access justice in UAE or to practice their right to legal remedy and fair trial constitutes an obstacle to redressing those victims, compensating them or restoring their rights despite their many attempts. Additionally, the law criminalizing sympathy towards Qatar, which was stipulated by the UAE authorities on 7 June 2017 to state that any form of sympathy with Qatar shall be a punishable offence, has hindered exercising this right as many Emirati law firms have rejected to be agencies for Qataris fearing that would be liable to the penalties prescribed in above mentioned law.
• Measures taken by the UAE in relation to economy, business and investment aim at negatively affect the infrastructure of the national economy of the State of Qatar as well as economic rights of individuals and communities, which forms a serious precedent that could amount to aggression.
• The UAE has failed to observe the minimum conditions for commercial, economic and investment transactions, which confirms the absence of a safe investment environment in a manner that guarantees the rights of investors, owners and workers, as well as lack of freedom of transporting goods and merchandise.
• The UAE has not taken into account the rights of priority groups, i.e. women, children, persons with disabilities and the elderly. Moreover, its arbitrary measures have caused deprivation of education, prevention from work, and violation of the right to health.
• The Blockade crisis has been prolonged as well as tragedies of the victims, their inequity and restoration of their rights, which threatens international peace and security and undermines all mediation efforts.
• The tragedy of separated families continues, which has led to a great disruption of the Gulf’s social fabric, and has aggravated suffering of women and children. This is considered a serious violation to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention to Prevent All Forms of Discrimination against Women.
• The UAE has not responded to the demand to rectify the violations and spare victims. All it has done was just a maneuver to improve its image or procrastinate the status quo. Also, mysterious mechanisms lacking credibility that it claimed were established to address the conditions of the victims has not addressed their situation. Moreover, these mechanisms were not communicated to the NHRC despite the Committee’s endeavor to do so.
• Letter sent from the NHRC to the similar national institution and some relevant civil society organizations in UAE were not responded to, and there has been no cooperation on their side since the beginning of the Blockade to date.
• Qatari authorities have not taken arbitrary measures similar to those taken by the UAE, and they have endeavored to contain the crisis and its negative implications on citizens and residents, including citizens of the UAE.

Recommendations

To the International Court of Justice:

1. Take measures to bind the UAE to take all necessary actions aiming at compliance with its commitments and obligations under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and to implement the provisions of the order issued by the International Court of Justice.
2. Compel Parties to develop a clear and transparent mutual work mechanism with regard to all victims and to follow up on its implementation.
3. Take into consideration the cases mentioned in the present report which are brought to court and consider them as part of the official documents of this case.
To the UAE:
1. Immediate lift the Blockade imposed on the State of Qatar.
2. To comply with the ICJ order and immediately implement all measures of order.
3. Revoke all unilateral arbitrary and arbitrary measures and to respect its commitments under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination as well as to redress victims.
4. Develop effective, clear, transparent and reliable mechanisms in cooperation with The Government of Qatar in order to address violations and redress victims.
5. Allow victims to resort to national justice and litigation for the purpose of recovering their rights.
6. Immediate end of defamatory campaigns, hate speech, incitements and hold those responsible for them accountable.

7. Stop making unfounded and illegal arguments in order to arrest and detain Qataris or residents of the State of Qatar and reduce racist actions against them.
8. Allow international organizations, technical missions of the OHCHR and special rapporteurs to conduct field visits to the UAE to verify, monitor and address violations resulting from the Blockade on the State of Qatar.
9. Immediately stop any escalation of the crisis.

To the Government of Qatar:

1. Communicate with the UAE to discuss developing a mutual mechanism to implement the International Court of Justice’s order and to monitor all violations occurring a year and a half after the issuance of the decision.
2. Monitor all violations occurring a year and a half after the issuance of the order and report them to the International Court of Justice and The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.
3. To assign specialized centers to evaluate physical and psychological damage and submit them to all competent authorities, specially the International court of Justice and the Committee against Racial Discrimination, for the purpose of compensating victims.
4. Submit a separate report about the UAE compliance with the order of the International Court of Justice issued a year and a half ago to:
• UN Secretary General.
• President of the International Court of Justice.
• Security Council.
• Human Rights Council.
• Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

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Ameera Alhedfa: Cooperation and integration between national human rights institutions is the way to strengthen their capabilities Doha: January 22, […]

Ameera Alhedfa: Cooperation and integration between national human rights institutions is the way to strengthen their capabilities

Doha: January 22, 2020

The Sub Regional Office Doha of the Asia Pacific Forum of National Human Rights Institutions concluded its workshop on the accreditation of national human rights institutions from 20 to 22 of this month. Ms. Ameera Alhedfa, Director of the Forum’s Regional Office, said that this workshop is the first of its kind organized by the Forum in the presence of chairs of national institutions that are subject to the accreditation for the first time and national institutions that will be subject to re-accreditation. Alhedfa pointed out that the workshop aims to develop skills and capability in the process and procedures of GANHRI accreditation and GANHRI’s subcommittee on accreditation (SCA), which is the body that assesses National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) in accordance with the Paris Principles. Alhedfa added that according to the Paris standards NHRIs that are assessed as fully complying with the Paris Principles are accredited as ‘A status’, while those that partially comply are accredited as ‘B status’. ‘A status’ NHRIs are able to independently participate in the work of the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms.

The second day of the workshop discussed compliance of national institutions with the principles of Paris, by Mr. Ammar Dweik, Director General, Independent Commission for Human Rights, Palestine, Deepika Udagama
Chairperson, Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka, Ms. Katharina Rose, Geneva Representative, GANHRI, Mr. Phillip Wardle, Legal and Policy Manager, APF and Mr. Mohammad Musa Mahmodi, Former Executive Director, Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission

On the third and closing day, the workshop focused on the accreditation process in the subcommittee on accreditation of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions, where Ms. Katherina Rose addressed SCA Telephone Interview and Post-SCA and Ms. Deepika Odagama and Mr. Philip Wardle discussed APF Support with Capacity Development.

It is worth mentioning that the submission by NHRIs of the application for accreditation for the first time should include several documents, including a copy of the law under which the institution was established, organizational structure, including the entire staff and annual budget, and a copy of its latest annual report, along with a detailed statement in which the institution shows aspects of its compliance with the Paris Principles, aspects of its non-compliance with these principles, and any proposals to ensure compliance. The documents referred to are submitted to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights four months before the next meeting of the Subcommittee on Accreditation.

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Dr. Al-Marri: Education Evidence is an important and essential step in the path of proper education and early awareness of […]

Dr. Al-Marri: Education Evidence is an important and essential step in the path of proper education and early awareness of legal culture

Al-Khater: What the State of Qatar has provided in general in the field of human rights is not hidden from the world

Doha: 14 January 2020

The National Human Rights Committee and the Ministry of Education and Higher Education launched Manuals for Human Rights Education for the preparatory, elementary, and secondary levels at the Cultural Salon at the Doha International Book Fair in its 30th edition. The National Human Rights Committee was represented by Mr. Sultan bin Hassan Al Jamali, Assistant Secretary of the Committee, While the Ministry of Education and Higher Education was represented by Ms. Mona Mohammed Al Kuwari, Director of Schools Evaluation Department. The inauguration is witnessed by a number of members of the National Human Rights Committee and officials of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education as well as the book fair audience. The manuals addressed many aspect including individual aspects (child rights), social aspect (children are born social beings) and the international aspect (the child is in The international community). Annexes include a reference to the International Convention on the Rights of the Child. The manual for the preparatory stage addresses the right to identity, the right to play and engage in recreational activities, the right to education, the right to health, the right to dignity, and the right to equality. The manual of the secondary stage includes an introduction on human rights education and references addressing (human rights .. origin and development, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to privacy, the right to justice, women’s rights, the right to build a family, the right to work, the right to a decent life, the right of the revolution, and the right to human solidarity).

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, stressed in the introduction of manual on the great importance of the process of integrating human rights concepts and principles into educational curricula. Al Marri said the National Human Rights Committee has participated in preparing these manuals in accordance with its mandate stipulated in Decree Law No. (17) for the year 2010, noting the belief of the National Human Rights Committee that this effort will have a positive impact not only on students, but also on those in charge of the educational process in general. Dr. Al-Marri said this step is an important and essential towards proper education as it contributes to the coming generations being aware of the concepts of human rights and freedoms from an early age.

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh stressed the necessity for generations to respect human rights and freedoms with open minds and straight morality that reject all manifestations of extremism, intolerance, violence and racism. He said: These generations must believe in the need for peaceful coexistence among all human beings with commitment and affirmation that preserving national identity, culture, customs and social traditions doesn’t contradict the principles and foundations of human rights. Noting that Islamic law, with all its humanitarian principles, has guaranteed and preserved human rights and freedoms.

Al Marri added: It is the keenness of the wise leadership of the state of Qatar and its unlimited support for the principles and issues of human rights and freedoms of citizens, residents or visitors, that motivates us to do our best and to fulfill our mission to fully protect and promote human rights. Pointing out that the permanent constitution of Qatar has established principles that reveal the special sanctity that the state attaches to human rights.

In the same context, Ms. Fawzia Abdulaziz Al-Khater, assistant undersecretary for educational affairs of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education said: Every person has the right to live and learn, and this right is the responsibility of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education in Qatar. Al-Khater said: The State of Qatar has outlined the programs, drawn up plans that have been implemented on a large scale, making education a human rights issue.

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Al-Mahmoud: The fair is one of the activities through which the committee seeks raising awareness on human rights Doha: January […]

Al-Mahmoud: The fair is one of the activities through which the committee seeks raising awareness on human rights

Doha: January 2020

The National Human Rights Committee participated in the Doha International Book Fair in its thirtieth edition, organized during the period from 9 to 18 January 2020. The committee’s booth includes a wide range of publications including books, introductory brochures, in addition to awareness stories for children, in addition to the Worker’s Booklet in (11) Language and the book on human rights in Islamic culture in Arabic, English and French along with the last annual reports of the committee on the human rights situation in the state of Qatar, and the last two issues of the quarterly magazine (Al Saheefa)

Mr. Abdullah Ali Al-Mahmoud, Head of Public Relations and Media Unit of the National Human Rights Committee said that the committee’s participation in the book fair and its constant eagerness to be present in several activities comes in the framework of its efforts to achieve its mission aimed at promoting, consolidating and protecting human rights.

Al-Mahmoud pointed out that the experience of the National Human Rights Commission’s participation in the Doha International Book Fair during the past editions had succeeded in achieving its goals, and he said: We continuously notice the growing interest of the exhibition’s audience in what the committee offers through its booth.

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December 16, 2019 Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Commission for Human Rights, met with the Deputy […]

December 16, 2019

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Commission for Human Rights, met with the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Arabian Gulf Affairs. During the meeting, a number of of human rights issues were discussed, and the two sides discussed ways to cooperate on issues of common concern. Dr. Ali bin Smaikh also met with Mr. Christian Silvo, President of The Qatari-European Friendship Association, and the meeting discussed ways of cooperation on issues of mutual interest in what promotes the human rights issue.

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Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, said that after more than 30 months, human […]

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, said that after more than 30 months, human rights violations are still continuous, stressing that it is unacceptable that the blockading countries continue to plunge families into Political conflict. Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri stressed in his intervention during a session entitled “Preserving human rights in times of crisis”, during the second day of Doha Forum, that the National Human Rights Committee will spare no effort to defend the rights of victims and those affected by the crisis, whatever the fate of the political crisis, pointing out that the National Committee will issue a report next month on the continued violations of the Emirati authorities in total disregard of the ICJ order.

On a question about the committee’s efforts in the light of the blockade crisis and handling of grievances submitted by Qataris, Dr. Al-Marri said: “the National Human Rights Committee monitors human rights violations resulting from the blockade and provide the necessary recommendations and inform the international human rights mechanisms at the United Nations, international organizations and specialized agencies about these violations”.

Al Marri added: “Since the beginning of the Gulf crisis, we have confirmed that states have a sovereign right to cut ties with Qatar, but that they have transcended them to take unilateral, arbitrary measures that amount to collective sanctions and economic aggression. Some of these countries announced that they have addressed some violations, but on the ground the violations are still continuing, especially by the UAE, and we have submitted reports to international bodies in this regard, and we will publish a detailed report on the continuation of their violations, during the next month. We hope that the blockading countries stop plunging families into the conflict and political differences, and I do not know the reason for their insistence to continue these punitive measures.”

Qatar has made numerous reforms to protect workers’ rights

On a question about rights of migrant workers in Qatar, and the laws it issued to improve the conditions of their work and residence conditions, the Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee said: “There are challenges in the Gulf region regarding the conditions of migrant workers, but there are many measures that have been taken in Qatar. Previously, there were many challenges such as the sponsorship law, delaying salaries, the difficulty of changing the employer, and imposing the exit policy, and that some expatriate workers fell prey to recruitment offices because of obtaining false contracts, and these were the most prominent challenges in the countries of source and destination countries. Our role in the National Human Rights Committee is to protect and promote human rights. Since the establishment of the committee in 2004, we have focused on the issue of workers’ rights, and made recommendations to introduce amendments to laws and legislation, and the government has begun to make determined efforts and reforms to delaying salaries. The Ministry of Labor has established a system to protect wages, where it becomes obligatory for companies to transfer salaries to bank accounts under the supervision of the Ministry of Labor. We have achieved many reforms, and difficulties remain because of companies that left the market, but the majority benefit from the new system. The government also created a fund for migrant workers, canceled the sponsorship system in 2015 and replaced it with a labor law that regulates the relationship between Workers and employers. There are challenges and difficulties that are not related to the State of Qatar, but rather to the country of origin that exports the labor, where workers are deceived by fake contracts, and in order to address this, recruitment centers were established in the countries of origin. The cabinet also approved a draft that will for the first time establish a minimum wage, all of which are measures aimed at overcoming these matters; noting that these efforts are referred to in the report issued by the International Labor Organization in Qatar on the conditions of migrant workers, and our focus in the National Human Rights Committee is on implementing laws in reality.”

A commitment to protect journalists

On the challenges facing freedom of expression and the protection of journalists, the chairman of the National Human Rights Committee said: “Journalists play an important role, and we on the one hand help to protect them through many mechanisms, such as organizing an international conference to defend freedom of expression. On the other hand, there are resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly on protecting Journalists in times of crisis. Next February, we will organize a conference on Social Media: Challenges and Ways to Promote Freedoms and Protect Activists; through these conferences and activities we raise awareness on how we protect the inseparable rights of journalists.”

Role of GANHRI

On the role of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions, Dr. Al-Marri-Secretary-General and Vice-President of GANHRI said: “GANHRI includes 110 national institutions established according to the Paris Principles that encourage all governments to establish human rights institutions to promote and protect Human rights in every country, At the same time, these institutions should cooperate with international institutions. the Global Alliance considers the protection of human rights an important indicator for achieving sustainable development in any country. A decision was recently adopted by UN GA to give national institutions the right to work with the United Nations. We can consider Human rights institutions in the middle between government entities and civil society, we work with governmental and non-governmental bodies, human rights organizations, and special rapporteurs because we are independent, and our primary role is to urge and encourage governments to ratify human rights agreements to ensure the compatibility of legislation with international human rights standards. ”

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Doha, December 13, 2019 Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, met in his office […]

Doha, December 13, 2019

Dr. Ali bin Smaikh Al-Marri, Chairman of the National Human Rights Committee, met in his office at the Committee’s headquarters with Her Excellency Ms. Koumbou Boly-Barry, the UN Special Rapporteur on Education, visiting the country from December 8 to 16. The two sides discussed the goals of Barry’s visit to Doha, as well as the role of the National Human Rights Committee in protecting and promoting the right to education.

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The NHRC celebrates International Human Rights Day at Hamad International Airport Maryam Al-Attiyah: – We must bet on young people […]

The NHRC celebrates International Human Rights Day at Hamad International Airport

Maryam Al-Attiyah:

– We must bet on young people to promote human rights in societies

– Human rights are a culture that must be rooted in society before being embodied in legislation and laws

– There is an urgent need to establish Arab mechanisms for strengthening the role of youth

– Surveys are required to provide an integrated database to spread awareness of the importance of youth participation in the promotion of human rights

– The participation of youth in all aspects of public life is an inherent right enshrined in international conventions and endorsed by regional and national conventions

– There is an urgent need to put more emphasis on the promotion of youth participation, renouncing guardianship over them and diminishing their capabilities

– The need for young people to enhance their capabilities to support their active participation must be taken into consideration

– The Arabic calligraphy on ‘Human Rights in Islamic Culture’ is a window to introduce the place of human rights in our true religion

Doha, December 10, 2019

Dr. Mohammed Bin Saif Al Kuwari, deputy chairman of the NHRC, opened on Tuesday on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day, which falls on December 10 each year a new version of the exhibition of Arabic Calligraphy on ‘Human Rights in Islamic Culture’ at Hamad International Airport; in the presence of Ms. Maryam bint Abdullah Al-Attiyah, Secretary General of the National Human Rights Committee, Mr. Sultan Al Jamali, assistant secretary- general of the NHRC, a number of representatives from Hamad International Airport and a number of Ambassadors to the State, along with cadres in the National Human Rights Committee, prominent national and international figures, and a large audience of travelers through Hamad International Airport.

The celebration of the human rights day this year comes under the generic call “Standing Up for Human rights” which is in an initiative by the United Nations to highlight the crucial role of youth in the collective and peaceful movements as a source of inspiration for a better future, and empower youth and youth organizations to act as a catalyst for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and to create a better world by promoting human rights, peace and equality. The UN’s call to action this year was to celebrate the potential of young people as constructive agents of change, communicate their voices, engage a wide range of global audiences in the promotion and protection of rights, and encourage, galvanize, and showcase how youth all over the world stand up for rights and against racism, hate speech, bullying, discrimination, and climate change, to name a few.

On the occasion of the International Human Rights Day, the National Human Rights Committee organized a “new version of the exhibition of Arabic calligraphy in Islam” at Hamad International Airport, which will last for 20 days, allowing thousands of visitors to Qatar and passengers crossing through Hamad International Airport to see dozens of paintings that reflect the place of human rights in the Islamic religion.
The audience visiting the pavilions of Arabic Calligraphy Exhibition in Islam was briefed on the exhibition which include creative paintings of Arabic calligraphy including Quran verses and sayings of prophet Muhammed that have a direct relationship with the international conventions on human rights with their translation into the languages of the world, especially English, French and Spanish in the framework of keenness to introduce the principles of the religion of Islam through art, and support the efforts of dialogue between religions, civilizations and cultures.

In a statement, Ms. Mariam bint Abdullah Al-Attiyah, Secretary General of the National Human Rights Committee, said that “the celebration of the International Day is an important occasion to recognize the achievements made by the State of Qatar in the field of protection and promotion of human rights, and to emphasize the keenness of the National Human Rights Committee to continue to urge the State of Qatar to continue the deep reforms it is undertaking to promote and protect human rights. ”
Regarding the importance of the call of action set by the United Nations to celebrate this year’s Human Rights Day, Al Attiyah said: the generic call to action “Stand Up for Human rights” carries a very important message, calling on all countries of the world to pay due attention to the youth, and bet on them to promote a culture of human rights in all societies, before being embodied in legislation and laws.

Al Attiyah pointed out that the National Human Rights Committee attaches great importance to the youth and their role in defending human rights and international legislation. “The participation of young people in all aspects of public life is an inherent right enshrined in international conventions and endorsed by regional and national conventions. all economic and social groups should be fairly represented where capacities of young people should be promoted to support their active participation. The National Human Rights Committee has noted in several occasions that there is an urgent need to establish Arab mechanisms to promote the role of youth where special surveys can be conducted, documenting the experiences of States, providing an integrated database that can be used to formulate their policies and enhance their efforts in spreading awareness aimed at encouraging their participation,” said Al-Attiyah

The exhibition on “Arabic Calligraphy in Islam” is a window to introduce the place of human rights in our true Islamic religion

As for the importance of organizing a new version of the Arabic Calligraphy Exhibition in Islam, in conjunction with the celebration of the International Day for Human Rights, the Secretary-General of the National Human Rights Committee said: “The National Human Rights Committee is always keen on educating and raising awareness of the place our Islamic religion has attached to human rights and the need to respect it “.
Al-Attiyah added, “The the Arabic calligraphy exhibition has turned into a cross-border platform to introduce human rights in Islamic culture, over the past years, and a window to raise awareness of Islam’s role in spreading the culture of peace and tolerance, and the dialogue between religions and civilizations that Qatar has repeatedly advocated in international forums, to combat the culture of incitement and violence that contributed to the spread of extremist ideas, as well as hate speech and attempts to attach terrorism to the Islamic religion. The exhibition also provides a true picture to Western societies of the place Islam has attached to human rights.
Al-Attiyah noted that the new version of the Arabic Calligraphy Exhibition in Islam is considered a new landmark in a long path for this exhibition, which has been previously organized in many world capitals, and attracted a large audience in several cities and capitals, including New York (at the United Nations headquarters), Geneva, Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Greece, Kuwait and Tunisia, as well as Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Qatar, Katara Cultural Village, Fire Station Artist in Residence, and other areas.

The exhibition of human rights in the culture of Islam in the eyes of the ambassadors:

In press statements on the sidelines of the opening of the exhibition “Human Rights in Islamic Culture”, His Excellency Ambassador Omar Al-Barzanji, Iraq’s ambassador to the State of Qatar, stated: “As you know, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was ratified in December 10, 1948. I highly appreciate the organization of this exhibition in this international occasion in the State of Qatar.”
He added: “I gave lectures on human rights to more than 400 diplomats at the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but it have never experienced that awareness can be raised through artistic paintings. I also thank the artist so much for his creativity, he was my student, and today I saw his creativity in artistic paintings.”

In turn, His Excellency Dr. Mustafa Boutoura, the Algerian Ambassador to the State of Qatar stated: “Choosing the idea of organizing a human rights exhibition in Islamic culture is a wonderful innovation. I suggest that this exhibition be organized in various International capitals, because it is important to talk about human rights from the perspective of Islam, the Holy Qur’an and the noble Prophet’s Sunnah, through wonderful artistic paintings. we desperately need to make the place of human rights in our true religion clear to the world”.

For his part, His Excellency Nizar Al-Heraki, the Syrian ambassador to the State of Qatar, said: “On the International Day for Human Rights, which expresses the aspirations of peoples to realize their rights and stop the violations taking place in the world, foremost of which is my country, Syria, in which the most basic human rights are violated in modern history. This exhibition expresses the human heritage found in the Islamic religion, which is the first human rights bill in the history of mankind. the existing paintings express the importance that Islam attaches to human rights, through the Quranic verses contained in these artistic paintings.
He added: “We highly appreciate the National Human Rights Committee’s invitation to attend the opening of this exhibition. The NHRC is always keen on human rights, and always keen to participate and contribute to organizing human rights related activities not only in Qatar, but also In the whole world.”

For his part, His Excellency Mr. Seichi Otsuka, Ambassador of Japan to the State of Qatar, said: “As you know, we attach great importance to human rights in Japan, and this exhibition is very important. It is wonderful that these paintings are displayed at Hamad Airport, which allows thousands of travelers coming to Qatar, or passing through Doha to visit.”

His Excellency Mr. Omelio Cabeiro Rodriguez, Ambassador of the Republic of Cuba to the State of Qatar, stated: “It is a wonderful initiative by the National Human Rights Committee to celebrate International Human Rights Day. This creative exhibition has a sophisticated artistic touch, drawing on Arab and Islamic art. It is extremely important to organize An exhibition addressing the place of human rights in the Islamic religion, in light of the exploitation of human rights issue for political purposes.

 

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